Criminal Law

Recently, Arizona passed a law, referred to as “revenge porn” making it unlawful to intentionally disclose the image of a person (who can be identified) shown in the nude or engaged in specific sexual activity when that person has a reasonable expectation of privacy. A.R.S. §13-1425 is the citation for the Arizona statute known as the “revenge porn” law.

Re-entering one’s community after the completion of a prison sentence is very challenging. Success can be difficult for many reasons. This article addresses one of the steps a person with a felony conviction might take towards overcoming barriers to successful community re-entry. The article provides information about setting aside both felony and misdemeanor convictions, restoring civil rights and restoring gun rights, based on Arizona law.

In Arizona, expungement has the same meaning as setting aside. Setting aside the conviction does not wipe out the conviction. The record of conviction is not destroyed. For the protection of the public, a conviction may be used to deny certain kinds of employment, licenses, permits, certificates as well as used against a person in future criminal cases, even though the conviction was set aside or expunged.

This website has been prepared for general information purposes only. The information on this website is not legal advice. Legal advice is dependent upon the specific circumstances of each situation. Also, the law may vary from state-to-state or county-to-county, so that some information in this website may not be correct for your situation. Finally, the information contained on this website is not guaranteed to be up to date. Therefore, the information contained in this website cannot replace the advice of competent legal counsel licensed in your jurisdiction.

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